{Convention Post #2} Spotlight Interview with Carole Guess, “How The NDSC Convention Has Impacted Our Lives”

setting the pace “I am a ‘mom-parenting-solo’ of an active nine-year-old living with . For me, the convention is truly a family reunion. That feeling of extended family and support is priceless,” said Carole Guess, mother of Evan.

Guess is one of more than 2,500 people are expected to take part in the 2014 National Down Syndrome Congress Convention in

SpecialMoms Parenting Magazine – Feature Interview With Drew Long

Have you had the opportunity to download your FREE digital copy of the SpecialMoms Parenting magazine?

If you haven’t what are you waiting for?

In this premiere issue you will meet inspiring women with a passion to help others. You will learn how these motivating mom entrepreneurs juggle the demands of
caring for their families, advocating for their child, all while running a business or building awareness through a charity or blog they created.

Meet inventors, award winning authors, bloggers and more!

Pictured above is Drew Long, creator of Caroline’s Cart.  The first ever patented shopping cart for children and adults with special needs.

To read more about Drew and her journey to become a mom entrepreneur click here.

How Is ADHD Diagnosed?

If you have a child that seems to act out more than others or who has a difficult time concentrating on homework and other tasks it may be time to find out if they have ADHD. ADHD stands for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and effects many child and even adults in our country. But how is this disorder diagnosed? Here are some things you and your doctor should be looking for.

Signs of the disorder are sometimes seen in the child before they even become of school age. Toddlers that have a lack of attention and are easily bored with watching TV or playing games can have ADHD. If a young child seems hyperactive or simply out of control this can be a sign as well. While these behaviors are somewhat normal in young kids it is recommended that they are seen by a doctor if these signs seem more prevalent than in other children their age.

When you do decide it is time to see a doctor they will sit and talk with you and your child to get a little background on the situation. They will try and rule out any other things in their life that could cause this type of behavior. Other things that can make a child act out of control or lack attention are a sudden change in the child’s life such as divorce or death in the family, an ear infection that can cause lack of hearing, a learning disability, or anxiety and/or depression. These other possibilities will be ruled out by talking with you and your child plus any necessary testing.

Once other things have been determined as not an issue with your child ADHD testing will begin. A specialist will put your child in different situations and monitor how their emotions are handled. Situations can include doing homework, putting together a puzzle, playing a board game, being put in a noisy room, etc.  During this time of testing your doctor may ask you and your child’s teachers to fill out assessment forms to see how the child interacts at school in comparison to home.  Be prepared to answer questions such as:

  • Do excessive behaviors affect all aspects of your child’s life?
  •  Do you see these behaviors happening more in your child then those children they interact with?
  • Are the behaviors continuous or do they normal stem as a response to a particular situation?
  • Do these behaviors only happen at a certain place or are they happening at home, school, playground, etc?

Because there is no one test to pin point if someone has ADHD doctors rely highly on your accounts and information. Before you actually take your child in to see the doctor try to remember times where your child has displayed ADHD tendencies and write down these occurrences. When you, your doctor, and your child’s teachers work together this deficit can easily be controlled. Children who are diagnosed with ADHD go on to live happy and productive lives thanks to all of those that helped in the diagnosis.

Written by: Tyler Clark works for the Liahona Academy and is an expert in ADHD information and knowledge.

SpecialMoms was so happy to have Cara Koscinski, Occupational Therapist, Author and special needs mom share
with us her presentation on Sensory Processing Disorder 101.  It was a great webinar filled with a lot of great information.

You can view the recorded webinar by going to our Webinar page.  You just click on the picture to be taken to another window where you will be asked to enter your email information to view the recording.

Featuring SpecialMoms – Want To Share Your Story?

special needs mom

Want To Be Our Featured SpecialMom?

Are you a mother of a special needs child, who wants to share an inspiring story? Whether it be about your child, your experience of being a mother of a special needs child or maybe you are an entrepreneur and you want to share how you juggle being a mother and business owner. Let’s share!

Sharing your story may inspire or motivate others. It may help them to reach for their dreams of running a business from home, or it may help to build awareness or an understanding of how difficult yet rewarding it can be for a family that has a child with a disability. This may promote compassion and maybe even some tolerance for people with disabilities.

Support * Inspire * Share that’s what SpecialMoms Entrepreneur Club is all about.

Whatever your story is, you never know how your story can touch or help someone else.

If you want to be one of our “Featured SpecialMoms, please fill out this form Featured SpecialMoms Form and email it back with a picture (if you want) to specialmompreneurs@gmail.com. We will post your story on our website and share it on our Facebook page, Pinterest and Twitter.

This is your moment to SHINE!

Introducing Your Child to Their School With a Student Snapshot

Beginning a new school year can be overwhelming to any child and their parents, but if your child has special needs it’s even more nerve wracking.

As the expert on your child, you as the parent or caregiver have valuable information that needs to be shared with the school community.  Who is the school community; these are people that interact with your child during the school day, besides their IEP team, it may include office workers, nurse, playground assistants, aides, teachers, bus drivers, or cafeteria aides you want them to know more about your child in order to assist them during their school day.

This is where a “Student Snapshot” can come in handy.  If the only information people have about your child is a special education label, they may make their own assumptions about your child that may be inaccurate.  Let’s say your child is on the playground and the aide, keeps calling your child to come in but your child doesn’t respond.  The aide may get frustrated with your child, not realizing your child has a hearing impairment.

This is where the “Student Snapshot” is perfect; it’s a simple, quick, concise way for you to share information quickly and accurately without long emails, missed phone calls or relying on others to relay the information.  This one page snapshot is more likely to be read and remembered.  Click for  Student Snapshot

Tips:

  • Keep it simple, like 5 bullets
  • Keep it short (one side)
  • Bulleted lists are easier to read
  • Avoid medical terminology since some people may not understand that important detail (layman’s terms)
  • Prioritize – just a few of the most important considerations that all staff should be aware of don’t duplicate the IEP.
  • Personalize it – put a photo on it so people can recognize your child
  • Decide who will need a copy of the “Snapshot”
  • Distribute it at a back to school night event, IEP annual conference and make sure to give a copy if any of these personnel change

 

How did you introduce your child to their school, teachers, students, etc?